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Star of Life Meaning and Description
    THE STAR OF LIFE
Each of the six "points" of the star represents an aspect of the EMS System.
They are:
Detection
Reporting
Response
On Scene Care
Care in Transit
Transfer to Definitive Care
The staff on the star represents Medicine and Healing.
  ANATOMY OF AN ACCIDENT WITH AN AMBULANCE CARRYING A PATIENT & PARAMEDIC
NEVER TAILGATE EMS
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    DAVE'S EMS HEADQUARTERS
       EMS ACTION PHOTOS Pg-1
   OBEY TRAFFIC        SIGNS AND LIGHTS
This includes when a family member is transported, do not try to keep up with the Rig, many accidents happen when family following, fail to yield
Priority One--Emergency Lights & Siren
Priority Two--Urgent
Priority Three--Non-Emergency
  PULL Safely to the Right for emergency vehicles IT'S THE LAW
Upon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle equipped with not less than l lighted flashing, rotating, or oscillating lamp exhibiting a red or blue light visible under normal atmospheric condition from a distance of 500 feet to the front of the vehicle and when the driver is giving audible signal by siren, exhaust whistle, or bell: The driver of another vehicle shall yield the right of way and shall immediately drive to a position parallel to and as close as possible to the right-hand edge or curb of the roadway, clear of an intersection, and shall stop and remain in that position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed, except when otherwise directed by a police officer.
Pay attention at cross streets
United Airlines flight 232    Captain Phil Hayes
Woodbury County Disaster           Director Gary Brown
   United Airlines flight 232 --Debris field
United Airlines flight 232 --Fuselage
United Airlines flight 232 --Memorial
Flight-232 during Emergency landing when wing dipped causing the plane to cartwheel
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After Gary Brown was the Woodward County Disaster Director. Gary Brown had put together one of the most comprehensive Inter-Agency Disaster Protocol system in the United States.  Despite enduring the criticism of many agencies including fire services personnel who claimed “He’s on a power trip.”

                   In addition to the professional criticism his disaster drills were mocked by local media. 

Then in July 1989 United Flight 232 a DC 10 carrying “296 soles on board,” from Denver to Chicago suffered catastrophic system failure loosing all three hydraulic systems the decision was made by Captain Al Haynes along with Federal air Traffic controllers to land at the Sioux Gateway Airport .

Sioux air traffic controllers, FAA employees notified the Woodward County Disaster office of Flight 232’s situation.  Gary Brown activated the tri-state emergency disaster protocol system as units began to respond they were notified to stage at the airport.

As EMS, Fire, Mutual Aid agencies and Guardsmen staged at airport’s gate. Both local and State Police staged throughout the area to handle traffic if necessary.  With the plan activated and unites were on scene and committed if needed.  As Brown monitored traffic between the tower and Flight 232.  As the large and fully loaded passenger plane was visible, all indications were that Flight 232 was going to successfully make a safe emergency landing.  That was not to be as the plane touched down its wing dipped causing the plane to cartwheel down the runway in a ball of flames.

As the plane tumbled down the runway the Airports Crash Fire Rescue Fire rolled out to fight the fire.  Brown moved out to the runway it became evident following the crash that passengers had survived.  A triage area was opened up immediately with precision patients were triaged rapidly as Fire crews quickly fought the fire made of jet fuel and burning fuselage.  Victims were transported by Helicopter, Ambulance and buses for those with minor to no injuries. 184 passengers were rescued and evacuated to area hospitals, 112 passengers perished.  Had it not been for the rapid mobilization of resources the number of passengers killed would have indeed been much higher.

The rescue response in Sioux City received international attention and is regarded today as one of the most outstanding and cooperative responses in the history of U.S. Airline crashes. Gary Brown would be and is needed to head up the need for EMS and Paramedic Representation in a newly formed office for Homeland Security.
ADDITIONAL DATA REGARDING EMS HAZARDS INCLUDING AIR MEDICAL INCIDENTS--FOLLOW-UP BY CLICKING "GO"
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      This Page was Last Updated On: May 27, 2014
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On a late Morning on May, 29, 2008 The Grand Rapids Michigan Based Aero Med Medical Helicopter was practicing "touch n go landings" on top of Spectrum Health's Downtown Butterworth  Hospital Campus.  Both the 61 y/o Pilot and an FAA Inspector escaped from the chopper moments before it exploded and burned.
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PULL Safely to the Right for emergency vehicles IT'S THE LAW
MOST DON’T REALIZE WHAT AN EMT IS, OR WHAT THEY DO SOME SAY THEY’RE JUST AMBULANCE DRIVERS THIS PLAINLY IS NOT TRUE

THEY DO DRIVE THE AMBULANCE WITH THE LIGHTS AND THE SIREN BLOWING BUT OTHER TIMES THAT SAME DRIVER IS IN THE BACK TRYING TO KEEP A LIFE GOING OR THAT SAME PERSON MAY BE OUT IN THE MUCK, THE BLOOD, AND POURING DOWN RAIN WORKING TO GET A DRIVER OUT OF THE CAR WHO IS IN SEVERE PAIN

BUT THE CALL THAT HURTS THE WORST FOR ALL EMT’S INVOLVED IS THE CALL WITH THE CHILD WHOSE PROBLEM CANNOT BE SOLVED.  EVEN WITH ALL THE TRAINING ONE CAN POSSIBLE TAKE SOMETIMES THAT TRAINING DOES NOT A DIFFERENCE MAKE.

IT IS THEN THAT YOU WILL SEE THAT STRONG EMT WITH TEARS RUNNING DOWN THEIR FACES AND A LOOK OF HUMILITY.  THE THOUGHTS OF THIS CALL WILL NEVER GO AWAY BUT THE EMT REALIZES THERE WILL BE ANOTHER DAY

A DAY IN THEIR LIFE THAT THEY LISTEN FOR THE CALL AND WHEN THEY ARRIVE ON THE SCENE THEY REALIZE AFTER ALL, THAT SOME DAYS OR GOOD AND SOME DAYS ARE BAD BUT ONE THING FOR CERTAIN, WITHOUT EMT’S LIFE WOULD CERTAINLY BE SAD.
No Such Profession--Ambulance Drivers!!
  AeroMed Wreckage removed
air evac lifeteam accident
Wreckage of Medical Helicopter
On Sunday July 19, 2009 The survivors, flight crew members, Air National Guard members, EMT's, Paramedics, Firefighters, Doctors, Nurses, Hospital employees, and citizens from the Tri-State area gathered at 4 p.m. July 19, 2009 at the Flight 232 monument along the Missouri River in downtown Sioux City to remember the 112 individuals who lost thier lives, and recall the preparations and outstanding efforts that spared 184 lives. Sunday July 19, 2009, marked the 20th anniversary of the crash landing of United Airlines Flight 232.  Flight 232 a DC-10 carring 296 passengers and crew were aboard the Denver-to-Chicago flight on July 19, 1989, when the plane's tail engine disintegrated at 37,000 feet, catastrophically severing all three hydraulic lines and disabling all normal flight controls.  Gary Brown, Woodbury County's Emergency Management Director, is credited in building the blue prints of "mutual-aid."  Brown remains Woodbury County's Emergency Management Director, today.
  20 Years Later
   1989-2009
New “ Howler Sirens” added to EMSA Ambulances Proven to Reduce Accidents
Ten-inch subwoofers called Howlers were installed in EMSA ambulances statewide beginning in November 2008, said spokeswoman Lara O’Leary. They emit a low-frequency hum that can cause vibrations up to 200 feet away, and EMSA officials credit the Howlers with cutting in half the number of crashes involving ambulances. “You can literally feel it, just like anyone that pulls up next to a car that has their stereo bumping extremely loud.”

In the first 10 months of last year, EMSA ambulances were involved in 16 wrecks at Oklahoma intersections, O’Leary said. But only eight were reported from January to October in more than 4.3 million miles of driving. Crash figures for earlier years were not available.

Remember that Ambulances respond to or from life threatening situations and need to get their patients to a health care facility as soon as possible.   11-14-2009
Drunk driver's skid marks from high speed collisionVehicle's struck x3Three vehicle's struck by drunk driver.Drunk drivers vehilce with Police response after driver fled.Drunk Driver Pick-up truck following hit and run.Close-up of one of three vehicles struck by the drunk driver.Damage caused by drunk friver who hit three parked vehilce's.
A drunk driver in May 2010 at 10:00a.m. slammed into three vehicles
  Wreckage of Medical Helicopter
                 EMS ACCIDENTS
"New Siren System helps reduce Accidents"
Post MCI Staging Area
Above: Interior of Vehicle post crash
This Grand Rapids Mercy Ambulance was enroute to a call in the early  80's when the Paramedic drving lost control and rolled several time.
Click above photo's to enlarge
Click to Enlarge Photos
  PULL Safely to the Right for emergency vehicles IT'S THE LAW
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Priority One--Emergency Lights & Siren
Aero Med Accident 3D Animation of the May 2008 Accident
Click Photographs to Enlarge
The United States Coast Guard Station Muskegon MI responds to rip tide rescue on Lake Michigan
Promed Responded to Beach for a Medical
Old Buuterworth Hospital Landing pad across street from Trauma Center-1989
1991 AeroMed Helicopter---Now Retired
1991 AeroMed Helicopter---Now Retired
  United States Coast Guard Air station Traverse City Michigan, June 1994. 
Helicopter transferred to a East Coast Station making way for today’s HH-65
AeroMed Wreckage
Paramedic Andre Lahens-FDNY EMS
Ambulance Broadsided by Drunk Driver on April 19, 2002
Photo by Woodtv8